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BCHM 496 - Complex Systems

A guide that covers using the library's search engine, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and SciFinder.

What is an Annotated Bibligraphy

You are likely familiar with a bibliography. Sometimes it is called a list of references, or just references. But, what makes a bibliography an annotated bibliography?

Not surprisingly, an annotated bibliography starts with a bibliography — a list of citations to journal articles, book chapters, or other sources of information. In addition to the citation, the annotated bibliography includes an annotation — a brief description of the journal article, book chapter, or other source. This description of the source is usually short (maybe 150 words) and tells why the source is relevant and might tell something about the quality of the source, and whether you believe it to be accurate (or not).

Annotations are not abstracts! An abstract is usually found at the beginning of a journal article. They are also found in research databases like ScienceDirect and SciFinder. Abstracts are only summaries of an article, book, etc. Annotations dig deeper, as pointed out above.

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